Upcoming Proposal Deadlines

Sponsored Research Administration Center Web Page

Upcoming deadlines that may be of interest to CIS PIs are listed below (if you know of a funding opportunity we're missing, please let us know!). If you are considering submitting a proposal, please contact our office early in the process so we can assist with proposal preparation (email srac@cis.cornell.edu). Note the following internal deadlines:

  • For full review at the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP), the proposal must be ready to submit at least five full business days prior to the sponsor's deadline.  Administrative portions may be reviewed separately from technical content if ready to submit five full business days prior to sponsor's deadline.  Administrative portions include the Form 10, application forms, CVs/biosketches, current and pending support, budget, budget justification, subaward documents, letters of support, postdoctoral mentoring plan, data management plan.
  • If you choose not to have OSP review your proposal, it should be ready to submit no later than 8:00am on the date of the sponsor's deadline in case of any unanticipated problems with the sponsor's submission system.
  • Additional funding opportunities may be located on Cornell's Office of Sponsored Programs Website.

September 27, 2017 - MEDIUM projects for NSF Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF) Core Programs The Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF) supports transformative research and education projects that explore the foundations of computing and communication. The Division seeks advances in computing and communication theory, algorithm design and analysis, and the architecture and design of computers and software. CCF-supported projects also investigate revolutionary computing models and technologies based on emerging scientific ideas and integrate research and education activities to prepare future generations of computer science and engineering workers.  Medium projects have total budgets of $500,001 to $1,200,000 for durations up to four years.  Note that CCF is not accepting LARGE project proposals in FY2018.

September 27, 2017 - MEDIUM and LARGE projects for NSF Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) Core Programs The Division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) studies the inter-related roles of people, computers, and information. IIS supports research and education activities that 1) develop new knowledge about the role of people in the design and use of information technology; 2) increase our capability to create, manage, and understand data and information in circumstances ranging from personal remote devices to globally-distributed systems; and 3) advance our understanding of how computational systems can exhibit the hallmarks of intelligence.  Medium projects have total budgets of $500,001 to $1,200,000 for durations up to four years. Large projects have total budgets of $1,200,001 to $3,000,000 for durations up to five years.

September 27, 2017 - MEDIUM and LARGE projects for NSF Computer and Network Systems (CNS) Core Programs.  The Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS) supports research and education activities that invent new computing and networking technologies and that explore new ways to make use of existing technologies. The Division seeks to develop a better understanding of the fundamental properties of computer and network systems and to create better abstractions and tools for designing, building, analyzing, and measuring future systems.  Medium projects have total budgets of $500,001 to $1,200,000 for durations up to four years. Large projects have total budgets of $1,200,001 to $3,000,000 for durations up to five years.

September 29, 2017 - Letter of intent for NSF EMERGING FRONTIERS IN RESEARCH AND INNOVATION (EFRI): Chromatin and Epigenetic Engineering (CEE) and Continuum, Compliant, and Configurable Soft Robotics Engineering (C3 SoRo)  (EFRI-2018) EFRI seeks proposals with transformative ideas that represent an opportunity for a significant shift in fundamental engineering knowledge with a strong potential for long term impact on national needs or a grand challenge.  The proposals must also meet the detailed requirements delineated in the solicitation.  Letters of intent (required) are due September 29, 2017; preliminary proposals are due October 25, 2017; full proposals are due February 23, 2018.

October 2, 2017 (4:00pm) - Executive summaries for DARPA Young Faculty Award (YFA) The DARPA Young Faculty Award (YFA) program aims to identify and engage rising stars in junior faculty positions in academia and equivalent positions at non-profit research institutions and expose them to Department of Defense (DoD) and National Security challenges and needs. In particular, this YFA will provide high-impact funding to elite researchers early in their careers to develop innovative new research directions in the context of enabling transformative DoD capabilities. The long-term goal of the program is to develop the next generation of scientists and engineers in the research community who will focus a significant portion of their future careers on DoD and National Security issues. DARPA is particularly interested in identifying outstanding researchers who have previously not been performers on DARPA programs, but the program is open to all qualified applicants with innovative research ideas.  The 26 topic areas for 2018 are listed on the Web page.  Executive summaries (strongly encouraged) are due by 4:00pm on October 2, 2017; full proposals are due by 4:00pm on December 4, 2017. 

October 10, 2017 - MEDIUM projects for NSF Secure & Trustworthy Cyberspace Program (SaTC)The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program welcomes proposals that address cybersecurity and privacy, and draw on expertise in one or more of these areas: computing, communication and information sciences; engineering; economics; education; mathematics; statistics; and social and behavioral sciences. Proposals that advance the field of cybersecurity within a single discipline or efforts that span multiple disciplines are both encouraged.  Medium projects have total budgets of $500,001 to $1,200,000 for durations up to four years.

October 10, 2017 - NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science.  NSF's Directorate for Engineering (ENG) and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) have joined to support the Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science program. This program supports active long-term collaborative partnerships between K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, Computer and Information Science, and Mathematics (STEM) in-service and pre-service teachers, full-time community college faculty, and university faculty and students to enhance the scientific disciplinary knowledge and capacity of the STEM teachers and/or community college faculty through participation in authentic summer research experiences with engineering and computer science faculty researchers. The research projects and experiences all revolve around a focused research area related to engineering and/or computer science that will provide a common cohort experience to the participating educators. The K-12 STEM teachers and/or full-time community college faculty also translate their research experiences and new scientific knowledge into their classroom activities and curricula. The university team will include faculty, graduate and undergraduate students as well as industrial advisors. Involvement of graduate students in support of academic-year classroom activities is particularly encouraged. Partnerships with inner city, rural or other high needs schools are especially encouraged, as is participation by underrepresented minorities, women, veterans, and persons with disabilities.  This announcement features two mechanisms for support of in-service and pre-service K-12 STEM teachers and full-time community college faculty: (1) RET supplements to ongoing ENG and CISE awards and (2) new RET Site awards.  Cornell may submit only one RET Site proposal per year in computing and information science.  PIs interested in submitting a site proposal should therefore contact SRAC as soon as possible; internal proposals must be submitted to OVPR by Tuesday, August 15.

October 18, 2017 - Preliminary proposals for NSF Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program (IUCRC).  The Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers (IUCRC) program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The Centers are catalyzed by an investment from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and are primarily supported by industry Center members, with NSF taking a supporting role in the development and evolution of the Center. Each Center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the Center faculty. An IUCRC contributes to the nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an IUCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context.  Preliminary proposals (required) are due October 18, 2017; full proposals are due December 20, 2017.

October 20, 2017 - FRONTIER projects for NSF Secure & Trustworthy Cyberspace Program (SaTC).  The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program welcomes proposals that address cybersecurity and privacy, and draw on expertise in one or more of these areas: computing, communication and information sciences; engineering; economics; education; mathematics; statistics; and social and behavioral sciences. Proposals that advance the field of cybersecurity within a single discipline or efforts that span multiple disciplines are both encouraged.  Frontier projects have total budgets of $5,000,000 to $10,000,000 with durations up to five years.  The Frontier competition replaces the Large competition of previous proposal cycles.  Prior to submission, the PIs must contact the SaTC program officer to discuss the suitability of the project to the Frontier-scale competition

November 1, 2017 - Full proposals for FY2018 Department of Defense Multidisciplinary Research Program of the University Research Initiative (MURI).  DoD's MURI program addresses high risk basic research and attempts to understand or achieve something that has never been done before.  Topics of interest for FY18 include (among others -- see program announcement for a complete list):  Embodied Learning and Control, Network Games, Physically Viable Learning for Control of Autonomous Dynamical Systems, Automated Technical Document Comprehension, Self-Assessment of Proficiency for Autonomous and Intelligent Systems, Advanced Mean-Field Game Theory for Complex Physical & Socio-Economical Systems.  White papers (recommended, but not required) were due July 17, 2017; full proposals are due November 1, 2017.

November 2, 2017 - Preliminary proposals for NSF CISE Research Infrastructure program (CRI).  The CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI) program drives discovery and learning in the core CISE disciplines of the three participating CISE divisions by supporting the creation and enhancement of world-class research infrastructure that will support focused research agendas in computer and information science and engineering. This infrastructure will enable CISE researchers to advance the frontiers of CISE research.  Preliminary proposals (required) are due November 2, 2017; full proposals are due January 11, 2018FAQ.

November 15, 2017 - SMALL projects for NSF Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF) Core Programs The Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF) supports transformative research and education projects that explore the foundations of computing and communication. The Division seeks advances in computing and communication theory, algorithm design and analysis, and the architecture and design of computers and software. CCF-supported projects also investigate revolutionary computing models and technologies based on emerging scientific ideas and integrate research and education activities to prepare future generations of computer science and engineering workers.  Small projects have total budgets up to $500,000 for durations up to three years.

November 15, 2017 - SMALL projects for NSF Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) Core ProgramsThe Division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) studies the inter-related roles of people, computers, and information. IIS supports research and education activities that 1) develop new knowledge about the role of people in the design and use of information technology; 2) increase our capability to create, manage, and understand data and information in circumstances ranging from personal remote devices to globally-distributed systems; and 3) advance our understanding of how computational systems can exhibit the hallmarks of intelligence.  Small projects have total budgets up to $500,000 for durations up to three years.

November 15, 2017 - SMALL projects for NSF Computer and Network Systems (CNS) Core ProgramsThe Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS) supports research and education activities that invent new computing and networking technologies and that explore new ways to make use of existing technologies. The Division seeks to develop a better understanding of the fundamental properties of computer and network systems and to create better abstractions and tools for designing, building, analyzing, and measuring future systems. Small projects have total budgets up to $500,000 for durations up to three years.

November 15, 2017 - SMALL projects for NSF Secure & Trustworthy Cyberspace Program (SaTC).  The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program welcomes proposals that address cybersecurity and privacy, and draw on expertise in one or more of these areas: computing, communication and information sciences; engineering; economics; education; mathematics; statistics; and social and behavioral sciences. Proposals that advance the field of cybersecurity within a single discipline or efforts that span multiple disciplines are both encouraged.  Small projects have total budgets up to $500,000 for durations up to three years.

December 13, 2017 - CYBERSECURITY EDUCATION projects for NSF Secure & Trustworthy Cyberspace Program (SaTC).  The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program welcomes proposals that address cybersecurity and privacy, and draw on expertise in one or more of these areas: computing, communication and information sciences; engineering; economics; education; mathematics; statistics; and social and behavioral sciences.  Proposals submitted to this designation leverage successful results from previous and current basic research in cybersecurity and research on student learning, both in terms of intellectual merit and broader impacts, to address the challenge of expanding existing educational opportunities and resources in cybersecurity.  Cybersecurity Education proposal budgets are limited to $300,000 and their durations are limited to two years.

December 14, 2018 - Letter of intent for NSF Mathematical Sciences Research InstitutesMathematical Sciences Research Institutes are national resources that aim to advance research in the mathematical sciences through programs supporting discovery and dissemination of knowledge in mathematics and statistics and enhancing connections to related fields in which the mathematical sciences can play important roles. Institute activities help focus the attention of some of the best mathematical minds on problems of particular importance and timeliness. Institutes are also community resources that involve a broad segment of U.S.-based mathematical sciences researchers in their activities. The goals of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institutes program include advancing research in the mathematical sciences, increasing the impact of the mathematical sciences in other disciplines, and expanding the talent base engaged in mathematical research in the United States.  Letters of intent (required) are due December 14, 2018; full proposals are due March 14, 2019.

January 8, 2018 - NSF Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontier.  The purpose of the Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontierprogram is to fund exploratory and synergistic research in learning technologies to prepare learners to excel in work at the human-technology frontier. This program responds to the pressing societal need to educate and re-educate learners of all ages (students, teachers and workers) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) content areas to ultimately function in highly technological environments, including in collaboration with intelligent systems. Innovative technologies can reshape learning processes, which in turn can influence new technology design. Learning technology research in this program should be informed by the convergence of multiple disciplines: education and learning sciences, computer and information science and engineering, and cognitive, behavioral and social sciences. This program funds learning technology research in STEM and other foundational areas that enable STEM learning.

Ongoing - IARPA BAA Early-stage research for Intelligence Advaned Research Projects Agency ("seedlings").

Ongoing - ONR BAA.  Long Range Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for Navy and Marine Corps Science & Technology

Ongoing - ARL BAA Army Research Laboratory Broad Agency Announcement (BAA)

Ongoing - AFRL/AFOSR BAA.  Research Interests of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Ongoing - US Air Force Academy.  Research Interests of the US Air Force Academy.

Ongoing - NSF Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE). The Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE) pilot continues to support bold interdisciplinary projects in all NSF-supported areas of science, engineering, and education research in FY16. INSPIRE has no targeted themes and serves as a funding mechanism for proposals that are required both to be interdisciplinary and to exhibit potentially transformative research (IDR and PTR, respectively). Complementing existing NSF efforts, INSPIRE was created to handle proposals whose: 1)Scientific advances lie outside the scope of a single program or discipline, such that substantial funding support from more than one program or discipline is necessary. 2) Lines of research promise transformational advances. 3) Prospective discoveries reside at the interfaces of disciplinary boundaries that may not be recognized through traditional review or co-review.  Maximum budget is $1M and award durations may be up to 5 years.  Prospective PIs must receive approval to submit a proposal from at least two NSF Program Officers, in intellectually distinct programs, whose expertise is most germane to the proposal topics.

Ongoing - NSF Cybermanufacturing Systems (CM).  The Cybermanufacturing Systems (CM) Program supports fundamental research to enable the evolution of a wide range of network-accessed manufacturing services that: 1) employ applications (or “apps”) that reside in the “cloud” and plug into an expansible, interactive architecture; 2) are broadly accessible, guarantee reliable execution and have capabilities that are transparent to users; and 3) are accessible at low cost to innovators and entrepreneurs, including both users and providers.  Collaborations between engineering and computer science faculty are strongly encouraged, as are collaborations with software, networking, internet service and industrial companies, including the partner institutes of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI, http://manufacturing.gov/welcome.html) and their member companies.